Explore The Kew Palace Royal Kitchens With This Interactive Guide

Explore The Kew Palace Royal Kitchens With This Interactive Guide

Step back in time and discover a fascinating insight into Georgian culinary life...

Explore The Royal Kitchens at Kew

On 6 February 1789, George III was given back his knife and fork after his latest bout of illness. On that day, The Master Clerk of the Kitchens was busy overseeing the preparation of the royal menu.

Step back in time and discover a fascinating insight into Georgian culinary life…

Explore the people and objects in the image to find out more >
The charcoal range Fan crane Men The kitchen work table Heating/cooling Animals in the Kitchens The vegetables The meat Kitchen implements Pots and pans Mr Wybrow - The Master Cook The Footman

Click the people and objects to explore

  • The charcoal range

    The charcoal range was little more than a row of charcoal barbeques that were used for boiling, frying and grilling.

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  • Fan crane

    Also known as a 'Smoke Jack'. The heat from the fire would have turned a big fan in the chimney which would then have turned gears that turned the spits which roasted the meat.

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  • Men

    It's no accident that there aren't any women in this image. The majority of the Georgian royal household was made up of male staff and professional cooking had always been a male job.

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  • The Kitchen work table

    The great table can still be seen in the Royal Kitchens today. A unique survival from the Georgian era, its surface is covered in marks from chopping up joints of meat.

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  • Heating/cooling

    Keeping the food hot or cold enough was not an easy task. Some ingredients were kept below ground to help keep them cool. Some serving dishes were hollow so that hot water could be poured into them to keep the food piping hot.

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  • Animals in the Kitchens

    There were cats in the kitchen building but like everyone else, they were there to work. Stored food and drains could attract rats and mice so the cats would have had to hunt for their meals!

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  • The vegetables

    Fresh vegetables were grown here at Kew and purchased from grocers as well. They were included in most meals, often as a side dish.

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  • The meat

    The Georgians wouldn't let anything go to waste. Food for most people was scarce so all parts of an animal that could be eaten, were eaten.

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  • Kitchen implements

    There may not have been any food blenders but the Georgians did have their own way of processing raw ingredients.

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  • Pots and pans

    Pots and pans, along with other kitchen equipment, had to be cleaned thoroughly after use or poisonous verdigris could form.

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  • Mr Wybrow - The Master Cook

    Everyone in the Royal Kitchens had their place. The Master Cook was in charge of the kitchen staff who cooked the royal meals.

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  • The Footman

    The Footman was one of a great number of people who ensured that the royal household got the food they needed.

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Further information

Having lain untouched since Queen Charlotte's death in 1818,
the Royal Kitchens at Kew can now be explored for the very first time.

Find out more:

The Royal Kitchens at Kew > Tickets and prices > Getting to Kew Palace > Become a member >