Key Stage 2

Key Stage 2

Two girls in a session on Raleigh

Sessions for 7 to 11-year-olds led by expert presenters and designed to support a range of subjects across the curriculum. All sessions are designed for up to 35 children.

How to book

A visit to the Tower of London supports teachers wishing to teach the new Primary History Curriculum Key Stage 2 breadth of study areas that relate to extending and securing pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066 and conducting a local history study – particularly one that traces key aspects of national history reflected in the locality. These route-based, investigative and object-handling sessions are led by expert presenters who use costume, stories and primary source material to support pupils’ knowledge and understanding of key aspects of history at the Tower.

The sessions develop pupils’ historical enquiry skills, ability to form historically valid questions and understanding of how the past is constructed from a range of sources. They are aligned with a range of subjects across the Primary Curriculum and designed for classes of up to 35 children.

Route-based sessions 

Tower Power: the Norman Conquest >
Royal responsibility: for King or country? >
Crime and punishment through the ages >

Object handling and investigative sessions

Pack up your troubles: why remember the First World War? >
The King beneath the armour >
Questioning the past through objects >
Questioning the past through costume >

Digital missions

The Prisoner's Perilous Plot >
The Lady's Royal Arrivals >


Tower Power: the Norman Conquest

(Tower Power)

It is 1097 and William I's greatest fortress and palace, the White Tower, has just been completed. One of William's courtiers will help students explore this magnificent keep, examining its exterior, defences and symbolic power as the great 'Norman fist on Anglo-Saxon soil'.

 The session relates to the KS2 history curriculum units ‘extending chronological knowledge of significant events in British history beyond 1066’ and is also appropriate for pupils studying the history of their local area.

Monday to Friday

10.30, 12.00, 13.30

One hour

£93 plus admission

How to book

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Royal Responsibility: for King or Country?

(Royal Responsibility)

It is early 1544 and there is a new Queen at court: Henry VIII's sixth bride, Catherine Parr. Students will visit sites around the Tower connected with Henry's previous wives. Accompanied by a courtier well-acquainted with the new Queen, students will hear about the momentous lives (and deaths!) of Henry's wives.

This session especially develops historical enquiry skills and supports chronological awareness and understanding of historical events and the impact that significant figures have made on our country’s past.

Monday to Friday

10.30, 12.00, 13.30

50 minutes

£93 plus admission

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Crime and Punishment through the Ages

(Crime at the Tower)

A key stage two sessionDespite not having been built as a prison, the Tower of London has, over the centuries, acquired a fearsome reputation as one of England's most notorious prisons. In this session, pupils will put themselves into the shoes of a prisoner at the Tower. Where would they have been locked up? What was the Tower like for a prisoner? What crime might they have committed?

Pupils will think critically, ask perceptive questions and hear exciting stories of the Tower's dark history, told by a costumed presenter. Pupils can explore some of the historic space originally used to hold prisoners.

This session fits well with a study of changes in an aspect of social history, such as crime and punishment from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  It also develops enquiry skills by exploring the historical environment through storytelling. Pupils will recognise and draw comparisons between their own experience and the lives of people in the past.

Monday to Friday

10.30, 12.00, 13.30

50 minutes

£93 plus admission

How to book

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Our guide was fantastic and made learning about the Tudors come alive.

Teacher comment


Pack up your troubles: why remember the First World War? 

(Pack your troubles)

This session, created jointly between The Tower of London and the Fusilier Museum, London, is based around the 2014 art installation ‘Blood Red Lands and Seas of Red’  poppies at the Tower and the collections of the Fusiliers Museum.  

It explores how, and why, we remember the First World War today, through storytelling, and handling contemporary and modern-day objects, photographs and documents, looking at the differing ways the war was viewed at the time.

The session relates to the KS2 history curriculum units ‘extending chronological knowledge of significant events in British history beyond 1066’ and is also appropriate for pupils studying the history of their local area.

Wednesday

10.30, 12.00, 13.30

1 hour

£93 plus admission

How to book

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The king beneath the armour

(King beneath armour)

Two boys laughingThis classroom-based session examines one of England's most famous kings, none other than Henry VIII himself: king, sportsman and Tudor superstar! Led by a costumed presenter, students will handle Henry VIII's replica armour and discover more about the man behind the metal.

This session especially supports skills of historical interpretation and enquiry, using a range of sources and testing their validity to construct a deeper understanding of Henry VIII.

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday

10.30, 12.00, 13.30

1 hour

£93 plus admission

How to book

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Questioning the past through objects

(Past objects)

An ITT session at the Tower

Become a history detective and investigate replica objects with the help of a Tudor costumed character. Examine the contents of a missing Tudor chest, and try to identify its owner using the objects as clues. This session provides pupils with the opportunity to think critically, weigh evidence and ask perceptive questions in order to construct the identity of an individual using objects.

 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday

10.30, 12.00, 13.30

One hour

£93 plus admission

How to book

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Questioning the past through costume

(Past costume)

Dressed for Court

The Tudors made expert use of clothing to express wealth and status. This session provides pupils with the opportunity to study luxurious replica garments to understand materials, money and rank and to identify similarities and differences between Tudor and modern clothing. Two pupils will be able to dress up in Tudor costume. The session supports the development of historical enquiry skills.

 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday

10.30, 12.00, 13.30

One hour

£93 plus admission

How to book

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Fantastic! Engaged every pupil for the whole time.

Teacher comment

This is the fifth time I have brought children to the Tower... each time I have been very impressed with each of the costumed guides!

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