Bloody Tower

When

  • Open daily

Ticketing information

Included in palace admission (members go free) Buy Tower of London tickets

Explore the most infamous prison at the Tower of London and learn about the intriguing stories that inspired the name 'Bloody Tower'.

Discover the story of the Princes in the Tower

The Bloody Tower is most strongly associated with the supposed murder of the 12-year-old Edward V and his younger brother, Richard, in 1483. Tradition says that they stayed in these rooms on the orders of their uncle, the future Richard III.

The princes' subsequent disappearance remains one of the most intriguing stories of the Tower's history. As the rumours grew, the tower was renamed the 'Bloody Tower' from the Garden Tower.

Learn why the boys came to be at the Tower and what we really know about their disappearance on the first floor of this notorious medieval building.

Sir Walter Raleigh at the Tower

A handsome courtier, celebrated explorer, favourite of Elizabeth I and scholar of poetry, history and science, Sir Walter Raleigh was also one of the most famous prisoners to be held at the Tower of London.

Learn more from Yeoman Warder Gary Burridge in this short video.

The entrance to the Bloody Tower, looking south-west. Showing the arched wooden doorway with metal studs.

The Bloody Tower was built by King Henry III (1207-72) and was originally named the Garden Tower.

Explore Raleigh's study in the Bloody Tower

Learn about the reality of high status imprisonment at the Tower in Sir Walter Raleigh's study in the Bloody Tower.

It was here that Raleigh spent 13 years as a prisoner during the reign of Elizabeth I's successor, James I.

Raleigh was allowed three servants and the interior was even partitioned to make more comfortable living conditions for his family. However, Raleigh's health and morale were poor.

Learn about Raleigh's inquisitive mind, his passion for poetry and science and the herbal elixir he concocted on this spot on the ground floor of the Bloody Tower.

See the portcullis up close

The Bloody Tower was not only used for keeping prisoners locked in; it was also built to keep people out!

See the Tower's awe-inspiring portcullis, which could shut off the gate passage below, and learn about the building’s history as part of this great medieval fortress.

The Beauchamp Tower, looking south towards an arrow loop window. A large wooden cross positioned on the floor can be partially seen in the foreground. 

The Beauchamp Tower was built between 1275-81 by King Edward I (1239-1307). It is named after Thomas Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick who was imprisoned in the tower in 1397, accused of high treason.
Things to see

Learn why people ended up as prisoners in the Tower of London, in the very rooms where some of them were held.

Open daily

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View of the White Tower exterior
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A young girl looks in amazement from the stone Battlements at the Tower of London
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Official Tower of London guidebook shows the many faces of the Tower from menagerie and jewel house to fortress and prison.

Official Tower of London guidebook

Official Tower of London guidebook shows the many faces of the Tower from menagerie and jewel house to fortress and prison.

£4.99

Featuring a sculpted designed of the Tower of London and an axe-shaped handle, this novelty mug makes a great gift.

Tower of London mug

Featuring a sculpted designed of the Tower of London and an axe-shaped handle, this novelty mug makes a great gift.

£10.99

Prisoners of the Tower uncovers the unpublished the history of the Tower of London as a place of torture and state prison.

Prisoners of the Tower

Prisoners of the Tower uncovers the unpublished the history of the Tower of London as a place of torture and state prison.

£8.99