The Crown Jewels

The world’s most famous Jewel Collection

Discover the world-famous collection of treasures including more than 100 objects and over 23,000 gemstones.

At the heart of the Crown Jewels collection are English Coronation Regalia – the sacred objects used in the coronation ceremony. 

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The Imperial State Crown

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The Imperial State Crown

The magnificent Imperial State Crown is worn by the monarch at the end of the coronation ceremony and at formal occasions like the State Opening of Parliament, reminding us the Crown Jewels is a working collection.  

Image: Royal Collection Trust/ © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021

The Imperial State Crown

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The Crown of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, 1937

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Koh-i-Nûr

The Koh-i-Nûr diamond is one of the most famous diamonds in the world. Probably originating from the Golconda mines in central southern India, the diamond has had a turbulent history. A symbol of conquest, the Koh-i-Nûr has had many previous owners, including Mughal Emperors, Shahs of Iran, Emirs of Afghanistan and Sikh Maharajas.

The East India Company took the jewel from deposed Maharaja Duleep Singh in 1849, as a condition of the Treaty of Lahore. The treaty specified that the jewel be surrendered to Queen Victoria. 

The Koh-i-Nûr diamond weighs 105.6 carats. It was once much larger but was re-cut in 1852 to improve its brilliance and conform to contemporary European tastes. The Koh-i-Nûr was set in the Crown of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in 1937.

Image: Royal Collection Trust/ © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021

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The Sovereign's Sceptre with Cross, made for the coronation of King Charles II in 1661 and used at every coronation since. Detail showing the monde and cross and the Cullinan I diamond.

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Sovereign's Sceptre with Cross

The Sovereign’s Sceptre with Cross was made for the coronation of Charles II in 1661. It has been used at all coronations since.

Image: Royal Collection Trust/ © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021

The Coronation

A photograph of the Jewel House in the Tower of London where the Crown Jewels are kept

The Crown Jewels at the Tower of London

The Tower of London and its people have protected royal treasures for more than 700 years. The medieval coronation regalia were kept at Westminster Abbey, but in 1649, after the execution of Charles I, they were brought to the Tower of London and destroyed.

In 1660 Charles II was restored to the throne, and new regalia were made for his coronation in 1661. These have been safeguarded by the Tower of London ever since and remain the heart of the Crown Jewels collection. Items from the Crown Jewels only leave the Tower of London for ceremonies like the State Opening of Parliament, coronations, and royal baptisms.​

The Crown Jewels at the Tower of London have survived many ordeals over the centuries, including the Great Fire of London of 1666, and the outrageous attempt of Captain Blood to steal the regalia in 1671.

Read more about the history of the Crown Jewels.

Image: Historic Royal Palaces

Visit the Crown Jewels

On display in the Jewel House

Today you can visit the Crown Jewels at the Tower of London and become part of its remarkable history.

Image: Royal Collection Trust/ © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021

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