Kitchen Garden

A taste of the gardens that would have fed the Royal Household through the 18th century.

A taste of the gardens that would have fed the Royal Household through the 18th century.

When

  • Open daily

Ticketing information

Included in palace admission (members go free)

Experience the recreated Kitchen Garden — restored to an approximation of how it would have looked in the 18th century. The food from these gardens once fed the Georgian royals and now supplies Henry VIII's Kitchens.

Few records survive of the original garden, but the layout of the beds can be discerned from contemporary paintings and engravings; as far as possible we have chosen historically accurate fruit and vegetable crops.

18th-century favourites

A speciality of the Georgian era were the Grand Sallats. Many published recipes featured intricate arrangements of 'no less than 35 ingredients' - well suited for adorning the royal table.

We may recognise some of the components, such as lettuce, rocket, endive, cucumbers and parsley. But how about Costmary, Hartshorn, Sweet Maudlin and Trick-madame?

We are growing these, alongside more familiar vegetable crops, in the central area of the Kitchen Garden. Peaches, apricots, nectarines, cherries and plums grow on the sheltered walls and a formal, box edged bed of soft fruit and standard dwarf apples completes the look.

The restoration project

The Kitchen Garden, following conservation of the Royal Kitchens in 2013. Glasshouses are seen behind the Kitchen Garden wall in the background.

The history of the Kitchen Garden

Aerial View of Kitchen Garden at Hampton Court Palace showing planting beds

The Kitchen Garden was originally built for William III and Mary II in 1689, on the site of Henry VIII's tiltyard. The tiltyard was divided into six square, walled areas, each approximately one acre in size.

When Queen Victoria came to the throne, she combined all of the royal kitchen gardens in the London palaces into one operation at Windsor Castle.

The Hampton Court Kitchen Garden was then leased out as market gardens for many years, before being converted to pleasure gardens in the 1930s.

More about the history of Hampton Court Gardens
The South Front and Privy Garden, looking north west across the fountain basin.
Things to see

Explore the Privy Garden, now restored to its former glory and complete with its intricate Tijou Screen.

Open daily

Hampton Court Palace

Included in palace admission (members go free)

Visitors explore Henry VIII's Kitchens after re-interpretation in 2018.
Highlights Things to see

Transport yourself back to the heyday of Tudor feasting and entertainment in Henry VIII's Kitchens at Hampton Court Palace.

Open daily

Hampton Court Palace

Included in palace admission (members go free)

Georgian architect stands in Clock Court at Hampton Court Palace, looking up at the Tudor building
Families Tours and talks

Shh! You're invited on a special mission… meet characters from history and explore the palace with the Time Explorers app.

Daily

Hampton Court Palace

Included in palace admission (members go free)

This fun apron is inspired by the suit of armour made for Henry VIII in 1540, on display in the Tower of London armouries.

Henry VIII armour apron

This fun apron is inspired by the suit of armour made for Henry VIII in 1540, on display in the Tower of London armouries.

£14.99

Henry VIII gauntlet armour oven glove made from Cotton twill with polyester thermal

Henry VIII gauntlet armour oven glove

This fun oven glove has been inspired by a suit of armour made for Henry VIII in 1540, which is on display at the Tower of London.

12.99

Tudor Kitchens:  The Taste Of The Fire book

Tudor kitchens: The taste of the fire

An illustrated book, written by palace curators and food archaeologists, explores eating at court and the Tudor diet.

£4.99