Kensington Palace Gardens

An intimate, tranquil and secluded oasis

An intimate, tranquil and secluded oasis

When

  • Open daily

Ticketing information

You do not need a ticket to enjoy the Kensington Palace Gardens. However, if you would like to explore inside the palace you will need to purchase an admission ticket. 

Free

Walk in the footsteps of royalty in the beautiful gardens of Kensington Palace.

The Sunken Garden

The beautiful Sunken Garden was planted in 1908, transforming part of the gardens previously occupied by potting sheds into a tranquil ornamental garden of classical proportions. It was modelled on a similar garden at Hampton Court Palace and celebrated a style of gardening seen in the 18th century.

The garden is terraced with paving and ornamental flower beds, surrounding an ornamental pond with fountains formed from reused 18th century water cisterns retrieved from the palace.

Today, the garden continues the tradition of rotational flower displays in the spring and summer. Vibrant colours and exotic planting are on display from April to October when the garden is looking its best.

In the spring, tulips, wallflowers and pansies bloom while in the summer months geraniums, cannas, begonias and many more provide the vivid colour.

Cradle Walk

An arched arbour of red-twigged lime, the walk surrounds the Sunken Garden with arched viewpoints equally spaced along the sides.

In the summer, this shady tunnel provides the perfect place to view the bright colours in the Sunken Garden to the north or the re-landscaped gardens to the south.

The trees have been coppiced, or stooled, meaning that they have been cut back to the ground. This preserves the original tree stock and allows new stems to be trained over the new framework of the bower.

Some people will remember the colloquial name 'Nanny Walk' as this beautiful spot was a favoured meeting point for the many nannies in Kensington.

Vines and planting across Cradle Walk in the gardens of Kensington Palace
The Orangery at Kensington Palace surrounded by the gardens. The Orangery was previously used as to house plants in the winter months but is now used a restaurant and wedding venue.

Formal gardens

Kensington Gardens began life as a King's playground; for over 100 years, the gardens were part of Hyde Park and hosted Henry VIII's huge deer chase.

When William III and Mary II established the palace in 1689, they began to create a separate park. Mary commissioned a palace garden of formal flower beds and box hedges. This style was Dutch and designed to make William, who came from Holland, feel at home.

The diarist, John Evelyn, described the gardens as 'very delicious'. On 2 September 1705 he wrote 'I was able to go take the aire, as far as Kensington, where I saw that house... & the plantation about it, to my great admiration and Refreshment...'

When Queen Anne came to the throne in 1702, she created an English-style garden. The Orangery was added in 1704, an elaborate greenhouse built in the style of an elegant palace to protect Anne's citrus trees from the harsh frosts of winter.

Anne also recognised the Orangery’s beautiful garden setting and graceful architecture made it a perfect venue for fashionable court entertaining away from the chaos of 'town'.

From 1728, Queen Caroline began to transform the 242 acres of Kensington Gardens into the park we know today. She created the Serpentine boating lake and the Long Water, as well as the Broad Walk and round pond. These are now in Kensington Gardens and looked after by The Royal Parks.

For most of the 18th century the gardens were closed to the public except on Saturdays and only to the 'respectably dressed'. The intriguing garden was admired by Samuel Pepys, amongst others, as 'a mighty fine cool place... with a great layer of water in the middle'.

A large four poster bed covered in detailed period fabric, in a bedroom covered in dark green wall decor
Things to see

Explore the beautiful private rooms at Kensington Palace where Mary II once took her meals, relaxed and entertained.

Open daily

Kensington Palace

Included in palace admission (members go free)

Highlights Things to see

Wander through the lavish rooms of the King's State Apartments, each one grander than the last, at Kensington Palace.

Open daily

Kensington Palace

Included in palace admission (members go free)

A long, bright pink and purple dress in a display case in a bright corridor at Kensington Palace. Two lamps are lit on either side of the case and a display stand is placed in the foreground
Things to see

Explore the evolution of Diana, Princess of Wales' innate sense of style in a new display at her former London home.

Daily

Kensington Palace

Included in palace admission (members go free)

Discover the history and design of Kensington Palace and learn about the royals who lived there in the official guidebook.

Official Kensington Palace guidebook

Discover the history and design of Kensington Palace and learn about the royals who lived there in the official guidebook.

£4.99

Crafted from fine English bone china, this mug features the famous royal unicorn from Kensington Palace gates.

Kensington Palace gates mug

Crafted from fine English bone china, this mug features the famous royal unicorn from Kensington Palace gates.

£35.00

This stunning tote bag features a 18th century view of Kensington Palace, showing the work of Christopher Wren.

Kensington Palace vintage tote bag

This stunning tote bag features a 18th century view of Kensington Palace, showing the work of Christopher Wren.

£12.99