Kew Palace is now closed for the winter months - re-opening on 29 March 2018.

The Great Pagoda at Kew

Re-opening to the public in 2018

Re-opening to the public in 2018

When

  • Opening Summer 2018

Ticketing info

Tickets are to be released for sale in 2018. 

Separate ticket

Thanks to the generous support of Sanpower, Historic Royal Palaces in partnership with Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, are undergoing a major conservation project which will see the Great Pagoda returned to its 18th-century splendour and re-opened to the public as a permanent exhibition.

The history of the Great Pagoda

Designed in the 18th-century by English architect Sir William Chambers for the royal family. Chambers visited China twice and he was inspired by the buildings he saw. His designs for the Great Pagoda were influenced by prints he had seen there of the famous Porcelain Pagoda at Nanjing. The Great Pagoda was the largest and most ambitious building in a ‘royal circuit’ of 16 structures displaying architectural styles from around the world building the royal garden at Kew. Once completed in 1762, the 163ft tall building was so exotic that a suspicious public were unconvinced it would remain standing.

Pagodas are revered in traditional Chinese culture as the repository of relics or sacred writings and as place for contemplation. The Kew Pagoda was inspired by the porcelain Pagoda at Nanjing – one of the wonders of the medieval world – and is not designed as a religious monument; rather it was intended to be a window for the British people into Chinese culture.

The Great Pagoda at Kew was originally far more colourful than it is today, and was once adorned with eighty ‘iridescent’ wooden dragons which were removed in 1784 when repaired were undertaken to the buildings roof. None of the 80 dragons appear to have survived, beginning a 200 year hunt to rediscover and replace them. Historic Royal Palaces intends to restore the dragons to the Pagoda once more, as part of this major conservation project.

The Great Pagoda at Kew will open to the public in summer 2018

Help us restore the Pagoda

How to make a Dragon - Part 1

How to make a Dragon - Part 2

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