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A royal Russian resident: Grand Duchess Xenia Romanov at Hampton Court Palace

On 6 April 1917, in the midst of violence and unrest, Grand Duchess Xenia Romanov left St Petersburg on a train to the Crimea, never to return again. Xenia's journey into exile eventually brought her to Hampton Court Palace.

The Tower at war

The Tower of London played an important role in the First and Second World Wars

A history of royal weddings

From Queen Victoria to the modern royals

Sophia Duleep Singh

The Indian Princess who fought for women’s rights

Objects Unwrapped: Grace and Favour Residents

When George III became king in 1760, he chose not to use Hampton Court Palace as a royal residence. So the palace was turned into a giant lodging house for Grace and Favour residents.

WHAT'S ON AT THE PALACES

  • Exhibition
  • Things to see

The Indian Army at the Palace

Explore the forgotten story of Indian Army soldiers who camped at Hampton Court Palace in the early 20th century, through a new exhibition of previously unseen objects, photographs, film and personal stories.

  • Until 29 September 2024
  • In line with palace opening hours
  • Hampton Court Palace
  • Included in palace admission (members go free)
Learn more
  • Things to see

Granville Garden

Take a moment in this elegant rose garden created by Lady Granville, aunt to Queen Elizabeth II.

  • In line with gardens opening hours
  • Hillsborough Castle
  • Included in all admission tickets (members go free)
Learn more
  • Things to see

Red Room

Political history meets royal life and a spectacular collection of art, deep in the heart of Hillsborough Castle.

  • Open Wednesday - Sunday
  • Hillsborough Castle
  • Included in combined castle tour and gardens tickets (members go free)
Learn more
  • Things to see

The Throne Room

Explore the ceremonial heart of the castle, where Queen Elizabeth II received guests at a coronation ball in 1953.

  • Open Wednesday - Sunday
  • Hillsborough Castle
  • Included in combined castle tour and gardens tickets (members go free)
Learn more
  • Things to see

State Drawing Room

Discover contemporary Irish art from the collection of His Majesty The King in this elegant family space.

  • Open Wednesday - Sunday
  • Hillsborough Castle
  • Included in combined castle tour and gardens tickets (members go free)
Learn more
  • Things to see

State Dining Room

Explore this stylish setting for Georgian entertainment, where Queen Elizabeth II hosted dinners.

  • Open Wednesday - Sunday
  • Hillsborough Castle
  • Included in combined castle tour and gardens tickets (members go free)
Learn more

OTHER PAGES THAT MAY BE OF INTEREST

A royal Russian resident: Grand Duchess Xenia Romanov at Hampton Court Palace

On 6 April 1917, in the midst of violence and unrest, Grand Duchess Xenia Romanov left St Petersburg on a train to the Crimea, never to return again. Xenia's journey into exile eventually brought her to Hampton Court Palace.

Objects Unwrapped: Grace and Favour Residents

When George III became king in 1760, he chose not to use Hampton Court Palace as a royal residence. So the palace was turned into a giant lodging house for Grace and Favour residents.

Secrets From Our Stores: Late Night Cocoa

The story of a cocoa tin that was hidden by workmen in the early 20th century, only to be uncovered by others almost 80 years later.

Objects Unwrapped: A 1930s Christmas Card

This is certainly not the most festive card you are likely to receive – the front cover for example shows the seal of the Tower of London along with its postcode! It was sent from Jack Burnard to L.V. Lane, a carpenter and joiner, working at the Tower of London from 1935 to 1939.

Leonora Cohen's Suffrage protest at the Tower of London

Walking to the Tower of London from the underground station with an iron bar hidden beneath her coat, the Suffragette Leonora Cohen gained access to the Crown Jewels with a plan to protest.

Beating the Bounds: A centuries-old tradition

On the evening of Ascension Day, a group from every parish and various governing bodies in England used to walk around the parameters of their land. Each boundary post would be beaten to mark it out in the minds of the younger generations and the clergy would pray for the land along the way. This tradition was known as Beating the Bounds.